Why is Lingerie So Expensive? Part 2: Creation

Harlow & Fox

Harlow & Fox

The bra you’re trying on feels like it’s made for you: nothing cuts into your figure, everything is perfectly held in place… But it’s so expensive! How can such a tiny piece of clothing cost so much? This is the second of a three-part series on why high-end lingerie costs what it does, from materials to construction to indirect costs you might not think about when buying that beautiful bra or panty. This month, let’s talk about creation costs: what it takes to actually put together a piece of fine lingerie.

Agent Provocateur

Agent Provocateur

Fitting



This is one super important aspect of lingerie production that is often taken for granted. We all know that fit is SO important in lingerie; no matter how cute it is, if a bra doesn’t fit, we won’t wear it! After the garment’s pattern is drafted, fittings are done on perfectly-sized human models with muslins, which are test garments made from inexpensive materials. Based on the alterations needed, a new muslin will be sewn for each fitting. A half-inch difference in gore width could decide whether a bra fits you or not, so it takes more fitting sessions for a bra than a t-shirt. Plus, if you’re a great fit model with perfect proportions and helpful knowledge about garment fit and construction, you’re well-paid! These necessary costs must be absorbed into the final price of the piece of lingerie.

Ewa Michalak

Ewa Michalak

Grading

Grading is the industry term for scaling a pattern into different sizes, and each size that is created costs extra. Bras that are made with cup sizes in mind are more difficult to grade than, for instance, a t-shirt. Larger breasts sit differently than smaller ones, and even for labels that make a small range of sizes, one style has to look as good on a 32B as it does on a 34D. Patterns that are difficult to grade naturally cost more.

Atsuko Kudo

Atsuko Kudo

Samples

Samples are the “test garments” that are shown to buyers, worn on the runway, and shot for photo campaigns. They’re sewn individually so they’re expensive to produce, and embellishments like embroidery that might be done using machine are sometimes done by hand for samples. They can end up costing more to make than the final marked-up retail price of a garment! The cost of samples must be made back in the final cost of the garment.

 

Rachel Rector

Rachel Rector

Cutting

After all the pre-production costs are paid for and orders are placed, the fabrics are cut. For fine lingerie, this means lots of tiny pieces in slippery, delicate fabrics like silk, power mesh and lace that need to be handled carefully. I talked more about the machinery typically used for fabric cutting in my tour of the [Lola Haze factory in New York], but if the label is doing a very small run (as is often the case with indie labels), the fabrics for all garments could be cut by hand with scissors.

A silk slip being sewn in a New York City garment district factory

A silk slip being sewn in a New York City garment district factory

Sewing

I can’t think of any step in the lingerie manufacturing process that can run without human assistance, and sewing is one of the most important jobs, especially for fine lingerie. There are many reasons I design loungewear instead of contoured lingerie, and one huge reason is that they require totally different skill sets! I can design, fit and produce a great knit bralette or silk tap pants from start to finish, but making a long-line underwired balconette bra with boning would be much harder for me and take far longer as it’s not something I’m trained to do. However, it’s amazing to watch someone sew the elastic *and* decorative ruffle onto the back band of a bra in a single two-second motion. Smaller stitches require a precise handling of the garment, and different casing and elastic techniques require specific skills. Even thinner needles must be used for fine silk fabrics. Plus, you know that cute bra you had to get rid of because its underwire poked you every time you wore it? It could’ve been saved by the right technician reinforcing the right spot to begin with. Fine lingerie requires workers with special skill sets.

Myla

Myla

Finishing methods

Fine lingerie requires strong finishes that withstand many wears but still look beautiful. French seams encase the raw edge of the fabric inside itself, take three times as long to sew as regular seams and are therefore more expensive to use, but are soft against your skin and look beautiful. Interesting finishes like a picot edge, frayed edge details, contrast binding and decorative stitching require special machines, attention to detail, and more time, which add to the final cost.

Stella McCartney

Stella McCartney

Embroidery that is engineered to fit the shape of a piece of lingerie can be exquisite. Hand embroidery, even when outsourced to less expensive locations with many skilled embroiderers like India, is incredibly costly and time-consuming, but looks so beautiful and allows the designer to utilize very fine metallic and silk threads that might get ripped up in a machine. Machine embroidery is less expensive, but still requires someone who can program and operate the machine.

Carine Gilson

Carine Gilson

Appliqued lace is one of the most gorgeous details of fine lingerie. It requires detailed cutting, placing, and stitching, so it’s incredibly expensive. This article by Karolina goes into detail on how it’s sewn, and showcases some beautiful examples.

Ell and Cee

Ell and Cee

Beading and embellishments

Although there are machines that can do amazing beading that looks hand-worked, those machines are very expensive and require special skills to operate. A lot of beading and sequin work is still done entirely by hand. Likewise, details that have to be hand-sewn like tiny bows, crystals, tassels, and some closures take time and money.

bras-stock

Hangers, tags and packaging

Finally, before a piece of lingerie is sent to a retailer, it must be individually folded or hung on a hanger, then tagged and bagged. This happens on all production runs, whether a company is making 50 or 5,000 panties, and the cost of the tags, bags, hangers and workers must be accounted for in the final price of the garment.

Even though you might not think about the efforts of all the people involved in these processes, your lingerie wouldn’t exist without them. The final post in this series next month will talk about the aspects of running a lingerie line that add to the cost of your lingerie, but keep your favorite lingerie brands in business! Are there any aspects of the creation process that surprised you?

Mad Mimi Form

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Quinne
Quinne Myers

Quinne Myers is a fashion and textile designer living in Brooklyn, New York. She currently designs for she and reverie, an oh-so-sweet loungewear line made in NYC's Garment District.

3 Comments on this post

  1. Linda says:

    Thanks for writing this series! I’ve read all of the articles in this series and found them enlightening.

    As a consumer, I’ve always wondered why the matching panties in a set are so expensive relative to the other items in the same set. Could you shed any light on this? For example, this Eberjey bra is $62, the matching lace chemise is $124, and he matching thong is $40. The price of the bra and chemise seem more than reasonable to me, given the technical skills and amount of lace needed to create them, but the thong! http://www.journelle.com/underwear/thongs/eberjey-carmen-thong/EBE-A1363LR.html

    Is there something about panty construction that I’m missing? Forgive me if I’m missing something obvious; I’d just love to know why panties always seem so pricey compared to the matching bra/loungewear. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

    • Quinne Quinne says:

      Hi Linda! I think high-end panties seem expensive because we just expect them to cost less. I feel like if a chemise costs $125, a matching panty makes sense at $40… and I’d think it would be more difficult to sew that thong than that chemise (look at the teeny-tiny piece of lace between the elastic on the back!).

      It’s also possible that (A) the bra has a smaller markup because that label’s customers might not pay more than $65 for that bra, or (B) if the thong was priced any lower, it would make the set seem less high-end, or (C) the thong needs to be about the same price as their other panties with more coverage… or so many other reasons! There is SO much that goes into pricing beyond just the literal size of the piece. I hope that helps!!

  2. […] in China where they manufacture their products, cutting down on some of the costs that typically drive up prices for indie […]

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