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Introducing Divamp: Couture Costume Design

Divamp gold bustier corset top

Even if you’re not into fantasy wear, it’s hard to deny the theatrical fabulousness of Divamp. Barcelona-based designer Boyd Baten has created a line of over-the-top wearable armor that is equally at home on an opera stage as it is at the Black Rock Desert of Burning Man. Part glam gladiator, part futuristic fetish, Baten’s pieces are true works of art.

It’s no surprise Baten ended up creating wearable sculpture. He grew up influenced by his sculptor father’s work. After a brief stint in art school, he began selling costumes during the early years of the acid/house dance scene in the 1990s. Since then, Baten’s work has evolved beyond costumes to couture-worthy pieces that are wearable art.



Pieces are created utilizing a polyvinyl material in mirror-like silvers and golds. Meant to mimic metals, the material is firm yet light weight and flexible. It is woven into dramatic silhouettes or broken down into fractured, honeycomb-like textiles to add visual interest. Additionally, many items also feature detailed hand embroidery which adds subtle texture and color or is used to emphasize the linear element of the piecework.

I love how the collection references styles from older eras and repurposes them in futuristic ways. You’ll note Egyptian, Victorian, and Edwardian influences are playfully paired with cyborg elements. The bustier pieces are especially fantastic, with piecework that molds to curves, often with built-in Elizabethan ruff collars and dramatic hip fins.

While these certainly appeal to the cosplay crowd, Divamp has also been creating costumes for all sorts of avant garde performers, from Burlesque to drag queens. In a real coup, Boyd Baten has even outfitted Azealia Banks. And while many of these looks are definitely meant for fantasy play or performance, several could definitely be incorporated into everyday sorts of costumes (i.e.. slinky clubwear or cheekily paired with black tie).

Divamp armour corset Divamp cage corset Divamp warrior helmet Divamp corset top2 Divamp Cleopatra wig Divamp armour corset top-2 Divamp bolero Divamp bolero-2 Divamp cosplay corset Divamp gauntlets Divamp Victorian neck corset Divamp shoulder pads Divamp Metropolis corset Divamp gauntles-2 Divamp-2 Divamp-1 Divamp-3

What do you think of Divamp’s designs? Could you see yourself wearing any of these styles? If so, where would you wear them?


Laurie
Laurie Shapiro

Laurie Shapiro is the former owner and designer of the luxury lingerie label, Toad Lillie. Based in Seattle, WA, she now helps lingerie businesses engage their customers through brand communications and social media.

2 Comments on this post

  1. Louise Fitzsimons says:

    Hi Laurie,

    After searching timelessly online, I was ecstatic to come across your amazing creations. They really are the most magnificent pieces of art I have seen. I do hope Hollywood has snapped you up for costume design on all their Sci fi productions. You are super talented and I wish you well. I would certainly love to see them for myself, but unfortunately I live in South Africa, and I doubt you ship this far. You have inspired me to create a vision for the African version of ‘Burning man’, known as Afrika Burn. Not that my look would come even close, but one can only dream. Thank you for sharing your craft. Take Care, Louise

  2. Jt says:

    I remember when I first saw these images in the 80s from Sorayama.

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