Posts by Cora

Sale Lingerie of the Week: Panache Sculptresse ‘Paradise’ D-J Full Cup Bra

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

asos panache sculptress paradise bra brief

Though the Panache line, and it’s juniors division, Cleo by Panache, are very popular on the lingerie blogging circuit, Panache’s plus sized/full bust range, Sculptresse by Panache, has received considerably less love from press and buyers alike. Though it’s been around for a few seasons now, this new sub-brand had had a bit of a slow start. Not all of their styles resonated with customers, for example, and from a marketing perspective, Sculptresse by Panache seemed to have some difficulty differentiating itself from other players in this space. Looking back, I also don’t recall any significant press outreach or a major launch event. The line just kind of arrived with very little fanfare, a less than auspicious beginning, especially from a brand many regard as an industry leader in this space.

asos panache sculptresse butterfly print

At any rate, in the seasons since their debut, I’ve seen quite a few things I like from the Panache Sculptresse collection, and the Paradise bra set (which also has a coordinating babydoll) is one of them. Prints and patterns can be a little hit or miss. Consumers want something that’s fun and fashion-forward, of course, but sometimes a print that looks stellar on a smaller cup size can be a bit much for a larger cup size. Ditto for lace trims or even certain colors. When a garment is being scaled up, everything else has to be scaled along with it.

asos panache sculptresse butterfly print closeup

I like the Paradise bra for a few reasons. The most obvious is that rich, deep purple color, as well as the vibrant tropical-inspired print and floral lace. But I also like that this bra is available in up to a 46 band size, which is definitely in the plus size range for lingerie. While I personally wish Sculptresse by Panache would extend into large back/small cup sizes (a perenially underserved market), I also acknowledge that their bread-and-butter and area of expertise is full busts (i.e. DD cup and up), so it’s really just a bit of wishful thinking on my part.

asos panache sculptresse butterfly print rear view

Anyway! This bra in on sale for under $30 at ASOS right now. As with all sale items all the time everywhere, sizes and quantities are limited, so if you like this and it’s in your size, better to buy sooner rather than later. This bra is also available at Figleaves and HerRoom, albeit for considerably more (although still on sale).

Have any lingerie addicts tried the Panache Sculptresse range? If so, what did you think of it?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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Lingerie of the Week: Lou ‘Folie Douce’ Bustier Longline Bra & Thong Set

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

lou folie douce longline bra thong set 2

I have been obsessed with Lou Lingerie’s ‘Folie Douce’ set since I first spotted it at last season’s lingerie market. Though I was familiar with the look of Lou, having run across them in boutiques like Journelle or what have you, it was this collection specifically that really put them on the map for me. The gorgeous embroidery combined with sheer tulle and the classic cut-and-sewn construction…I just adore everything about this range. It is one of the best stories for Spring/Summer 2015, in my opinion.

lou folie douce longline bra thong set 3There’s always a bit of waiting game once you leave market, and not just because you’re seeing things 6 months in advance; it’s also because you have no idea if stores and boutiques are going to pick up the stuff you loved. There’s a lot of pieces I talked about in last season’s report that are never going into production simply because the buyer interest wasn’t there. In the American market in particular, customers skew towards t-shirt bras and other “invisible” styles. Features like seaming, embroidery, raised lace or what have you, tends to do less well in the US market since consumers here are very conservative regarding their underwear. All that said, I am very happy to report that Folie Douce longline bra and thong (i.e. the pieces featured here) have been picked up by several boutiques!

Sugar Cookies (where the image at the top of this post is pulled from) has both pieces. Journelle has also the longline bra and thong, in addition to the boyshort (my top panty pick because that just means more gorgeous embroidery). And if you’re not into longlines or thongs, HerRoom has the plunge version of this bra and the bikini style panty which are also, of course, gorgeous.

lou folie douce longline bra thong set

For the longline bra and thong, you’re looking at a price point of around $155-159 for the set. Choosing the boyshort instead adds about $15 to that price. The plunge bra and bikini are selling for around $135 for the complete set. Size range for the longline bra is 32B-36D. Size range for the thong and boyshort is S-L. Size range for the plunge bra is 32C-38D, and the size range for the bikini is S-XL.

What do you think of Lou Lingerie’s ‘Folie Douce’ set? Would you wear it?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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Lingerie Lust Objects: Myla Compelling Lace Halterneck Bra

myla compelling lace white halterneck bra

Though I used to be a tremendous fan of Myla (in fact, some of the bras I purchased from there years ago were in my regular rotation until they fell apart), I admit to not having paid much attention to them lately. They were still coming out with pretty designs, it’s true; it’s just that none of their products felt particularly compelling. In an increasingly crowded marketplace, “pretty” just isn’t enough to grab a potential customer’s lingering attention. There’s lots of pretty out there now.

myla compelling lace black halterneck bra

So imagine my surprise when I stopped by their site for my one of my semi-annual, “what’s new” visits and came across this gorgeous confection, the Compelling Lace Halterneck Bra. I don’t know if Myla has hired a new designer or what, but this bra (along with several other pieces, like the Dainty Embroidery Plunge and the Floral Embroidery Basque) are the most exciting pieces I’ve seen come out of Myla in ages.

myla dainty embroidery nonpadded plunge

The Dainty Embroidery Plunge and Compelling Lace Halterneck bras in particular reveal a level of elegant sophistication and creativity that I believe the luxury space can always use more of. There’s no seaming, no darting…just copious amounts of beautiful materials. And can we talk about how neither style is reflective of this whole strappy, bondage, harness trend that’s going on right now? We’re living in an era where it seems like every brand is trying to capitalize on the codes of kink and fetish style; kudos to Myla for going in a more romantic direction.

What do you think of these bras? And have you been by Myla’s website lately?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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For When You’re Feeling Luxurious: 12 Downtown Abbey Inspired Robes

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

Like so many people around the world, I’ve caught Downton Abbey fever. While I do watch the show for its rich cast of characters and intriguing treatment of the English class system, I mostly keep watching it for the amazing costumes. I’m a total costume drama junkie, and this show gives me my historical fashion fix every week.

Jenny Packham Robe via Net a Porter (discontinued)

Jenny Packham Robe via Net a Porter (discontinued)

Though I’m certainly not a hardcore costumer, one of the things that’s most interesting to me about putting together a historical wardrobe is the use of lingerie to help the female actors get more into character. Early 20th century underpinnings were a completely different beast from the kind of underwear that’s readily available today. Intimate apparel was infinitely more structured, even during the relatively free 1920’s. Fabrics had far less innate stretch and “give.” And most undergarments were simply better and more intricately made (which is why a return to that kind of construction would be prohibitively expensive today). I’ve read that being corseted or girdled or gartered helps with giving authenticity to the character… not just in terms of the historical silhouette, but also in terms of demeanor and bearing and posture.

Carine Gilson Robe via Netaporter (discontinued)

Carine Gilson Robe via Netaporter (discontinued)

While this blog post is not a full treatment of the lingerie for Downton Abbey, I thought it might be fun to focus on one small element: the use of dressing gowns (also known as full length robes or housecoats). This is a period in history when everyone wore a robe, not just for propriety’s sake but also because houses could be drafty and central heating was not yet a thing. While robes are perhaps not as essential as they used to be, they are a still a fantastic item to add to your lingerie wardrobe… particularly when you can find a robe infused with vintage flair. Here are 12 of my top picks.

Josie Natori Couture Sarimanok Robe - $2,900 (on sale for $2,030)

Josie Natori Couture Sarimanok Robe – $2,900.00 (on sale for $2,030)

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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Indie Designers Unite! Lingerie Lovebomb 2015

For the third year in a row, independent lingerie designers across the UK have joined forces for the cross-promotional Lingerie Lovebomb, a celebration of innovative design and non-corporate (and very often woman-owned) lingerie brands! TLA has been covering the Lovebomb event since 2012, and it’s really exciting to see that this campaign is still around, especially in an era where collaboration is more the exception than the norm. While the actual event is offically over, I thought the images were so beautiful I had to share them here. In fact, this is my favorite Lovebomb campaign so far. All photos are by Anna Swiczeniuk. Model is Miss Deadly Red. Check the captions of each image for the designer credits.

Had you heard of the Lingerie Lovebomb before? And do events like this affect your purchasing decisions?

lingerie lovebomb playful promises kiss me deadly

Kiss Me Deadly Waspie and Knicker, Playful Promises Bra and Eye Mask

lingerie lovebomb sparklewren playful promises

Sparklewren Corset, Playful Promises Knickers

lingerie lovebomb 2015 ayten gasson

Ayten Gasson Bedjacket and Knickers, Playful Promises Bra and Suspender Belt

 

lingerie lovebomb miss mandalay kiss me deadly

Miss Mandalay Bra and Brief, Kiss Me Deadly Longline Girdle and Stockings

lingerie lovebomb karolina laskowska playful promises

Karolina Laskowska Waspie and Knicker, Playful Promises Bra and Pasties

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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The Challenges of Representation: Opening a Lingerie Boutique for the LGBTQ Community

jeanna bluestockings

Today’s guest post is by Jeanna Kadlec. Jeanna is the founder of Bluestockings Boutique, the only lingerie boutique in the United States explicitly geared to the LGBTQ community. She has a Masters in English from Brandeis University and has written for Qwear, Ladypreneur League, and Feminist Wednesday. She lives in Boston. You can connect with Bluestockings on Facebook and Twitter.

Starting a new business is hard, no matter which way you slice it. The stats are staggering: eight out of 10 new businesses fail within the first eighteen months. And for women entrepreneurs – the hearts, minds, and souls behind the vast majority of indie brands, boutiques, and blogs in the lingerie industry – the outlook is even worse. Female entrepreneurs are uniformly not as well funded as their male counterparts; they receive less venture capitalist and angel investor funding than men and are more likely to use their own money to launch (a.k.a more likely to “bootstrap” it), which comes with a wealth of personal risk.

So, why bootstrap a lingerie boutique geared towards the LGBTQ community? Why start a business for a group of people so ignored by an industry that much of the population itself thinks, “Why would I need/want/spend so much money on that?”

Because it’s not enough to only have one major blog explicitly run by an out gay woman (The Lingerie Lesbian).

Because it’s not acceptable for The Lingerie Addict to be the loudest voice for change in the industry. A voice is needed, but when the loudest progressive voice consistently comes from a blog, and when progress is consistently slow, you know there is a problem.

Because it’s not enough to have brands like Play Out making gender-neutral underwear if no one stocks them.

At the end of the day, this is an industry with many moving parts. I saw a significant gap happening on the boutique end of the spectrum, and, quite notably, the gap between the lingerie community and the queer community has to be bridged.

Frankly, none of it was happening fast enough for me.

That’s why I decided to start Bluestockings Boutique.

*

There are a number of personal barriers to entry. Most notably, I don’t have a business background! I jumped in because I saw a desperate need in the industry, and I’m not willing to wait around until it gets filled. I’m long on conviction, but short on business experience. Consequently, I’ve spent plenty of time in bookstores, coffee shops, and libraries over the last six months, culling through a stack of borrowed books for advice. Luckily, the internet has democratized the start-up landscape, so my learning curve has been accelerated by the fact that I can easily read through blogs comparing accounting software while still in bed at 8 a.m. with my laptop and a fresh cup of coffee (what, that doesn’t sound exciting to you?).

nomi ellenson rain 2

Rain Dove by Nomi Ellenson

Challenge: The Responsibility & Challenge Of ‘Queer Aesthetic’

The challenge of being a singular source of representation is that the burden of representation falls on your business. However, no one can be all things to all people. Businesses themselves are deeply aware of this. Nubian Skin is a great example of a new company who has done a brilliant job of clearly communicating their capacities and limits as a new brand while handling a high volume of customer criticism due to their limited size range. Nubian Skin has said that they will expand their size range soon. But that takes money and time, and they only just launched. To my mind, the obvious answer is not having the burden of representation (in this case, nude lingerie for dark-skinned women, especially black women) fall on one brand alone. It’s easier to serve your customers well when you are not expected to serve the needs of an entire population.

I see striking similarities in starting a business geared toward the LGBTQ community, also deeply underserved by the lingerie industry. The difficulty, however, is that a “queer aesthetic” is an ineffable quality that is so individual. If five different people started lingerie boutiques with the LGBTQ community in mind, you’d probably end up with five markedly different inventories. The last thing I want to do is try and promote any “queer aesthetic” in lingerie, because I think that queer underthings are any underthing worn by a queer-identified person, end of story. I’ve done market research and solicited input on inventory, but at the end of the day, this is just my vision for the store, one that will grow and expand as I learn more about who my customers are and what they want – just like any business owner.

I am also sensitive to straight-identified people getting their queer education from Bluestockings. This means that people are going to be exposed to items they may not have seen or even heard of before, such as binders and underwear that allows for packing. Moreover, I don’t believe in segregating these items out (like many sex shops do) into “genderqueer” sections. Frankly, that’s the equivalent of when people say, “What you do is fine, but I don’t want to see it.” Underthings can be reflective of identities, but at the end of the day, they are just options for all of us. None of it is shameful.

nomi ellenson rain 3

Rain Dove by Nomi Ellenson

Challenge: You Can’t Buy What’s Not Available

There’s plenty of feminine lingerie to choose from; there’s not nearly as much androgynous lingerie. And honestly, of the androgynous options currently available, a lot of them still swing pretty femme.

It is important to stock androgynous and masculine-of-center options because lingerie is traditionally considered to be feminine and heteronormative. This isn’t to say that androgyny is, as it is often considered to be, masculine. Plenty of queers of all genders celebrate their femininity in radical ways. However, context is critical here, and in lingerie, femininity is strongly associated with and specifically presented in, I would suggest, heteronormative ways. Thus, offering less feminine items is something that is vitally important to me in terms of making Bluestockings not look like every other boutique.

Moreover, there are a number of gaping holes in the underthings industry that need to be filled. A few that immediately come to mind: boxers and boxer briefs for plus sizes, more androgynous bras that have underwires, more options for top underthings outside of bras and binders, and more no-frills, androgynous styles in all categories of lingerie (perhaps most especially loungewear). This is in addition, of course, to the needs of underrepresented sizes. And for anyone who wonders what I mean by androgynous, it can be as simple as not putting a bow or lace on something. Eschewing such small but distinctly feminine details can do wonders for a person’s psyche.

While no one can be all things to all people, I do worry about disappointing my LGBTQ-identified customers. I don’t like letting people down. While I know that I personally have done the legwork and know that Bluestockings will be providing some of the best options available, I still want it to be more, and I know that it can’t be: partly because of limited startup costs, partly because the LGBTQ-friendly options we would want to see just are not there, and partly because we are one store and simply cannot do everything for everyone.

It’s similar to the problem brands like Nubian Skin and Chrysalis ran into. When a population has been so underrepresented for so long, and along comes a brand (or store) telling them that they are going to open with that population especially in mind, how can you not help but get your hopes up? And to an extent, how can you not help but be disappointed when they don’t meet your every expectation? While Chrysalis is, perhaps, an example of what not to do (most notably for failing to respond to customers), Nubian Skin is an example of how to work with customers and respond to criticism and be transparent about the process.

However, Bluestockings didn’t come out of my desire to meet these particular needs that aren’t currently being designed (though who knows what the future holds?). It came out of my own frustrations as a lingerie consumer of not having a place to go that explicitly considered me. It came out of a desire to curate a collection specifically for queer people. I wanted to pull the few options I did see into one place.

nomi ellenson rain 4

Rain Dove by Nomi Ellenson

Challenge: Being Online

The choice to go exclusively online has given us wonderful flexibility, but has come with its own set of distinct challenges. These challenges have less to do with who we are serving and more to do with how we are serving people. There are three particular challenges I’ve met with (so far!) as an exclusively online retailer.

A number of brands just won’t sell wholesale to retailers who are exclusively online. I completely understand this, particularly when a brand’s sales are largely (or exclusively) online themselves.

Still other companies won’t sell to an e-commerce store until after you’ve launched. They want to see if, as a new business, you can make it. So they wait for months (or even years) before accepting a wholesale order. They’re protecting their own brand identity by waiting to associate themselves with your brand. Again, it is a completely reasonable business practice, but one that does cut down on the number of potential brands (particularly recognizable brands) that an e-commerce store can stock right out of the gate.

The third practice is one I have reservations about, because, to my mind, it discounts the vitality of digital business. Some brands have different minimum order requirements for brick and mortar businesses as opposed to online boutiques. Notably, the different requirements for online businesses aren’t designed to prove the digital seller’s legitimacy (i.e. that they aren’t a discount seller, which is a valid concern). Rather, these order minimums are prohibitively large for an online startup, reaching into the five-figure range. A new online boutique (any new independent boutique, I would wager) cannot afford to spend five figures on one brand alone. This kind of requirement cuts everyone out except the biggest online retailers.

nomi ellenson rain 5

Rain Dove by Nomi Ellenson

Challenge: No matter what business you’re in, businesses are made up of people, and people are people.

Which means that your business interactions with companies can be amazing or less than amazing. This has particularly come into play with our biggest, most unexpected struggle: finding binders.

As of this writing, it is uncertain whether we will have binders in stock for our launch, which is heartwrenching. Binders are a cornerstone of queer underpinnings—one of the most recognizable staples, even if not always the most popular option. However, we have only ever heard back from one supplier of binders during the wholesale inquiry process and may not have binders in time for our launch. But, businesses are made up of real people. Emails fall through. You never know what’s going on. As someone who is trying to bring binders and bras together as options for people of all genders, unexpected setbacks in this particular area have proven a challenge. I am encouraged by the example of other brands and stores who have been transparent about their processes, and hope that a similar transparency in communication will help mitigate these bumps in the road.

*

It’s 2015, and the world is changing, some say. Gay marriage is headed to the Supreme Court. We have a black president.

But as of February 16, 2015, six trans women have been brutally murdered this year (one each week). In early February, a lesbian couple was shot to death in their home in Massachusetts. There is civil unrest over the deaths of countless black men and women in this country at the hands of those who are supposed to protect them. Selma was nominated for Best Picture, but it’s the whitest Oscars since 1998.

Lingerie might seem like an unusual stage on which to discuss things like representation and equality. Capitalism and activism make strange bedfellows. But change starts from the ground up, in the nooks and crannies of our everyday lives, in the places we regard as safe and normal. It starts by altering our language to be more explicitly inclusive. Not everyone has to run an explicitly diverse boutique, but starting to be more explicitly representative of others doesn’t just change how you run your business. It helps change people’s hearts and minds. It helps change a culture.

Representation is not an idea. It’s a practice.

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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9 Black Owned Lingerie Brands You Should Know

In the United States, February is officially Black History Month. It’s also the month for Valentine’s Day, and, in terms of fashion, February also happens to include New York Fashion Week and Lingerie Market. It’s a busy time with a unique confluence of events… which is why I thought it might be fun/interesting to do a blog post dedicated to lingerie designers who also identify as black.

Yet there’s also another incentive behind this article – one which I’m sure you can guess. As I’ve mentioned several times before on TLA, the lingerie industry has very little diversity, and that includes racial/ethnic diversity. While we usually discuss the more consumer-facing side of diversity (i.e. the models and brand ambassadors), it’s also true that the business side of lingerie (as in, the people that own, develop, and design the brands) are rather homogenous as well. Of course, this is true of fashion in general, but since TLA is a lingerie blog, it makes sense to focus on the intimate apparel element.

Bjite Lingerie by Diana St.Louis (no longer in business)

Bjite Lingerie by Diana St.Louis (currently unavailable)

Obviously, there are lots of reasons for this kind of uniformity in intimate apparel. Speaking from an economics perspective, we know there are fewer entrepreneurs of color in general; they tend to lack access to the kind of business loans and startup capital that allow for risk. From a social psychological perspective, we know that cognitive processes like homophily make it harder for minority groups to access the mentorship networks that are necessary to success (while simultaneously disadvantaging them through phenomena like stereotype threat and status expectations). Factor in the already astronomical costs of beginning a lingerie brand, and, well… I won’t say it makes sense, but it’s obvious there are some larger, systematic issues at play here.

However, wanting more diversity in the lingerie industry is not just about it being a “nice thing to do.” Why? Because the invisibility of underrepresented individuals affects everything else – from brand offerings to product names to advertising campaigns. Narrowing the focus down to people of color, phenomena like referring to beige as “natural nude,”  or using ethnic stereotypes in advertising are both side effects of the lack of racial and ethnic minorities in lingerie. When a brand has never had to consider how their products might be perceived by other people, screw ups are inevitable. On every possible level, in a multitude of ways, the sameness of the lingerie industry is directly impacting what’s available to consumers.

Sugarlesque Lingerie by Ruka Johnson (no longer in business)

Sugarlesque Lingerie by Ruka Johnson (no longer in business)

That said, there is a huge bright spot… and that is the fact that it’s never been easier for a brand to promote themselves and find their customer base. While many industry heavyweights are still strongly opposed to ecommerce and social media, these are the exact marketplace developments that have allowed new brands (including brands that would have been marginalized a decade ago) to thrive. When a newcomer to the industry doesn’t have to rely on a boutique to move stock or on a trade journal for a favorable review, the metaphorical playing field levels out. Instead of waiting for the traditional industry gatekeepers to take notice, diverse companies can now reach out directly to their target consumers, neatly avoiding the endless political minefields of knowing the “right” people or appearing in the “right” stores.

As the title of this article says, this piece focuses on lingerie entrepreneurs who are also black. I certainly don’t see it as the beginning and the end of our treatment of diversity on TLA, and I hope to feature other articles in this same vein later on this year. Of course, if I’ve left a black designer off this list that you know of, please include their link in the comments. And if you have suggestions for other articles focusing on traditionally underrepresented groups, definitely feel free to share that in the comments as well. Finally, if this article isn’t your cuppa tea, that’s cool. I encourage you to hit up the search bar, and visit another post on TLA. We’ve got almost 2500 articles here, and most of them aren’t about black people, so you’re sure to find something you love.

How important is industry-level diversity to you? Do you notice when the individuals behind the brands are people of color or women or LGBTQ individuals?

Urban Intimates

urban intimates lingerie

Founded by Psychelia Terry in 2009, Urban Intimates specializes in budget-friendly full bust and plus size lingerie. They are currently stocked at Macy’s and JC Penney’s, and they also sell direct to customers through their own website.

 

Nubian Skin

nubian skin lingerie

Created by Ade Hassan, Nubian Skin made headlines around the world with the debut of their “nude” lingerie collection specifically designed for women of color. The company also sells thigh highs and tights available in a range of darker skintones, and has plans to expand their size range in the next couple of seasons.

 

Nude Barre

nude barre tights

Speaking of hosiery, this legwear line created by ballet dancer Erin Carpenter features 16 different skin hued shades. Nude Barre offers tights for both adults and children, and has fishnet, opaque, sheer, and crystallized varieties.

 

Erica M.

erica m bodysuit

Moving from practical lingerie to the more editorial stuff, Erica M. creates intriguing, avant-garde bodywear and tights. The founder, Erica Young, designs the products in New York and manufactures them in Italy. Current stockists include Nordstrom and Free People.

 

You! Lingerie

you lingerie

The only label for pregnant women on this list, You! Lingerie’s founder Uyo Okebie-Eichelberger offers a new, playful take on nursing bras, maternity bras, and nursing pajamas. They sell directly on their website as well as through select brick and mortar retailers.

 

Just My Jammies

just my jammies

Just My Jammies is a relatively recent lingerie brand specializing in loungewear. The brainchild of Tiffany Shanelle, Just My Jammies features teddies, jumpsuits, bodysuits, and other easy silhouettes.

 

Nightly Allure

nightly allure red bow set

Owned and run by Asha Etchison, Nightly Allure is a burlesque-inspired, boudoir-friendly lingerie line inspired by all things theatrical and daring. A standout item is their one-piece bow playsuit, shown above.

 

Suzy Black

Suzy black Lace Bralette Sleep Pant

Suzy Black is a very new lingerie brand that just debuted during last season’s Lingerie Fashion Week, and I confess to not being 100% certain they’re still in business (though the website is still up and their Twitter and Instagram have had relatively recent activity). Suzy Black’s emphasis is on sexy boudoir apparel.

 

Sojourn Lingerie

sojourn lingerie nima

The newest name on this list (they’ve only launched within the past few weeks) Sojourn Lingerie is a lingerie, sleepwear, and swimwear brand based in Washington, D.C. and inspired by the 1930’s-1950’s. All garments are handmade to order in their Chevy Chase, MD studio.

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

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And the Winners of the Elila Lingerie Valentine’s Day Giveaway are…

ASIA

Petra Kos and Michele Frykas!

Congratulations Petra and Michele! I’ll be in touch with your shortly to put you in contact with Elila and discuss the details of your prize.

Thanks to everyone for entering our Valentine’s Day Giveaway and have a wonderful day!

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

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Make This Valentine’s Day a Personalized One With Cheekygram Lingerie!

Disclosure: This blog post is sponsored by Cheekygram.

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With only a few days left ’til Valentine’s, lots of people have lingerie on the brain. Obviously, lingerie makes a great gift, not just for February 14th, but for anytime of year. In addition, I’m firmly of the opinion that lingerie still counts as a “gift,” even when you’re giving it to yourself, if you want it to. But if you’re wanting something a bit “off the beaten path,” so to speak, why not take a look at customized lingerie from Cheekygram?

Cheekygram is all about flirty, fun lingerie that gives the power of creation and design back to the customer. Looking for something special, unique, or just plain quirky? Cheekygram has you covered with their range of customizable panties printed with fun, witty sayings.

Furthermore, Cheekygram has carefully selected undergarments that are fashionable and comfortable all on their own. Their boyshort, for example, features matching lace trim and a ruched cheeky back. There’s also a thong and a brief featuring an opaque cotton front and a sheer lace back… perfect if you can’t decide which look you like more. And lest we forget, there’s the near endless variety of design, ranging from romantic quotes to funny sayings to retro designs. There’s even an option to add your own text!

Whether you’re new to the world of lingerie or a dedicated lingerie lover, Cheekygram offers fantastic, inspiring lingerie that will surely help to create memories. Below are a few of their most popular Valentine’s Day designs.

Have you ever tried custom-printed knickers? And, if so, what did you think of them?

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Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lingerie Review: b’tempt’d by Wacoal Ciao Bella Bra Set

Note: I purchased this lingerie with my own money. Wacoal is unaffiliated with this review.

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I’m trying to catch up on lingerie reviews so I can get on to some new things, and this photoset was one of the ones that was waiting in my DropBox. Though I’m not the biggest Valentine’s Day fan, this is the time of year that people are thinking of pink and red lingerie, so it felt appropriate to go ahead and finish writing my review of Wacoal’s b.tempt’d Ciao Bella Balconette Bra and Tanga set this week. As the note at the top of the post says, this is not a review sample; I bought it for myself sometime last year as part of my commitment to add some color to my lingerie wardrobe (I failed and am now back to all black everything, but at least I tried, right?).

b.tempt’d by Wacoal is Wacoal’s equivalent of a ‘Juniors’ section, similar to how the labels Pink by Victoria’s Secret and Josie by Natori are also meant to be for a younger demographic. As a marketing strategy, it’s brilliant because you’re able to build brand affinity at a relatively early age, and, hopefully, become someone’s bra brand of choice for the rest of their life. In practical terms, a sub-brand targeted towards younger people affects factors like price point, fabric choice, and silhouette. Full price, this bra set (i.e. both bra and panty) retails for under $60. If you’re willing to buy last season’s colors and manage to catch a sale, you can probably get this for under $40. That’s not a bad value, especially for what I believe is a very pretty bra set.

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I purchased the bra in a size 32D and the panty in a size Large. I honestly have no idea why I sister-sized down; I must have been an experimenting mood. The bra is in a balconette style (think an almost 18th-century neckline) with foam-lined contour cups and lace overlay. The cups are underwired, but have no padding, so you’re not going to get the kind of lift or ‘oomph’ you’d get from a push-up style. The wings are mesh (a fishnet style mesh in the fashion color on the outside with a beige mesh lining the inside), and hook-and-eye closures are two rows and three columns. The tanga panty is a cheeky style. On me, it looked a lot like a wide side thong – not very much coverage in the back.

In terms of materials, everything felt appropriate for the price point. Nothing was scratchy or itchy or felt cheap to the touch. I wouldn’t expect French Chantilly lace, but the value/price equation (especially considering how accessible this set is and frequently it’s on sale), felt right on the nose to me. Both pieces are made of nylon/spandex, with the bra cup lining being made of polyester.

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In terms of fit, I would say this bra runs small…and not just because I sister sized down. I felt like the breast tissue on the sides especially (right near my armpit) was not contained, and the cups themselves seemed to give me just a little bit of quadboobing on the front. I didn’t necessarily feel unsupported, but there was definitely the sense that I was outside the boundaries of whoever this bra was meant to fit. I can’t say I’m surprised since this is a junior’s range, but you may want to sister size up, especially if you tend to be between sizes. Continuing on, I’m not sure how to best describe the band. It didn’t feel tight or dig in (just slightly snug in fact…almost like my 34s), but it also felt like I was pushing the limits of the band…like just a couple more wears would permanently stretch out the elastic. Even so, if you have a heavier bust, you may want to opt for the tighter band, especially since the thin spaghetti straps will dig into your shoulders if the weight of your bust pulls the bra down. Since this is a balconette style, I’d say it’s best suited for shallower shapes. I also think of myself has having widely spaced breasts (I can rest four fingers flat between them), and I thought this bra worked nicely for that as well.

As far as the panties, there’s not as much to say. They technically fit, but if you have a larger bottom, expect a lot of cheek. I’d like to see a true boyshort or brief to go with this, but I also understand the tanga choice since this is meant to be one of b.tempt’d’s flirtier offerings. There is no kind of lining under the lace of the panty, just that all-important cotton gusset. I suppose what I’m saying is that it’s a nice matching piece, but there’s nothing especially newsworthy here.

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Overall, I think this set is a great value for the money, though it may take some trial and error to find your best size. Because of the lace and the cut, I don’t really think of this as an everyday bra or a t-shirt bra, but I do think it’s a fantastically accessible “sexy” lingerie set that can be worn beyond the boudoir. It’s also available in new colors every season, which is a definite perk if you happen to fall in love with it. In sum, I’d say this is a bra set worth trying, especially if you have a smaller budget.

Have you ever worn the b.tempt’d brand? What did you think of them?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube