Posts with tag "lace"

Review + DIY: Velvet Heart Lace Socks

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

"Lithe Is But a Dream" lace socks from Velvet Heart via ModCloth

“Lithe Is But a Dream” lace socks from Velvet Heart via ModCloth

I’m not much of a fancy sock person – San Francisco is a leggings and tights kind of city. But it’s definitely been getting warmer, summer’s been getting longer, and I’ve been trying to mix up my wardrobe in general, so I fell in love with the idea of these lace socks.  Unfortunately, the reality fell far short. The issue is definitely one of quality rather than design – I still think the socks are adorable and am hoping to at least squeeze a photoshoot out of them before they fall apart.

"Lithe Is But a Dream" lace socks from Velvet Heart via ModCloth

“Lithe Is But a Dream” lace socks from Velvet Heart via ModCloth

I bought the socks from ModCloth, knowing full well they were a final sale/no returns item. When they arrived, I admired the cute cardstock packaging, wrapped with a grosgrain ribbon, detailing care instructions (machine wash cold, tumble dry low), and of course, the original brand name: Velvet Heart. Luckily I saved the label otherwise I completely would’ve forgotten that information for this review, as ModCloth always conceals original brand names.  Velvet Heart still has the socks available in a handful of colors.  (Don’t be confused by their product image: it’s a technical drawing, not an actual photograph of the sock or even the same lace.)

I slipped them on to pop down the block to run an errand at work. Even just trying them on they seemed awfully snug. I have small feet, size 6, standard width, so that was a bit surprising.  Baring my knees, I wore them with a simple dress and black pumps.  My work is literally a block down the street from me, so I walked a total of two short blocks. By the time I got back, my toes had already popped through!  I was shocked… I had just paid $10 for socks that I wasn’t even able to wear for a full hour before they developed holes!

The problem lies in the construction. The sock is seamed together from a lace fabric, which on its own might be fine. It’s held together with a narrow overlock and matching wooly nylon thread. I wear the seam along the outside edge of my foot, twisting it to a back seam at the heel.  My toes popped through the fabric at the seam, which leads me to believe that A) the seam allowance is too narrow, and/or B) it was stitched with a “sharp” needle rather than “ballpoint.” A sharp literally punctures the fabric for each stitch and is used for woven fabrics, whereas a ballpoint rolls the individual threads aside and is used for knits. Upon closer inspection, it seems the fabric was cut on the wrong grainline, with the stretch running vertically rather than around the foot.  No wonder they felt so snug when I tried them on!

DIY pattern for lace socks. Print to fill a standard letter size sheet of paper.

DIY pattern for lace socks. Print to fill a standard letter size sheet of paper.

As I said, I think they can be salvaged for a photoshoot, but I certainly won’t be able to wear them out, especially with heels.  Still, I think the simple construction would make for a fun and easy DIY project.  Attached is a pattern I’ve drafted for this style of sock.  To put it together, remember to pay attention to the direction of stretch and use a ballpoint needle. Even if you don’t have an overlock machine, you could try using a faux-verlock stitch on a home sewing machine, or combining a straight stitch with a zig zag to finish the edge. Remember to test your tension settings on scraps of your fabric.  I would use a double pass zig zag to add an elastic trim like the one on the Velvet Heart socks, but you could fold under 1/2″ and do a simple zig zag if you’re using stretch lace fabric yardage. (These are DIY/home-sewing options, not production standards, FYI.) Alternatively, you could buy a a fixed width stretch lace, which is often used for making lace mitts and bralettes, and tailor the sock height to match its width, using the scalloped edge to avoid finishing the top of the sock altogether.  You’ll need a lace that’s a minimum of 9″ wide – I think ideal would be about 12″. If you want a taller sock, you’ll have to add width to the top to create a calf shape.

What do you think of lace socks? Is there a particular brand that makes a style you like? Are you going to try to DIY your own lace socks now?

Marianne

Marianne

Marianne Faulkner is the designer of Pop Antique, a clothing and corsetry line specializing in sustainable materials and comfortable curves. She is based in San Francisco where she earned her MFA in fashion design at the Academy of Art University, and has been a columnist at The Lingerie Addict since 2011.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookPinterestYouTube

Lingerie Review: Marie Jo ‘Catherine’ Bra Set

Note: I purchased this lingerie with my own money. Marie Jo Lingerie is unaffiliated with this review.

TLA_Primadonna_Catherine-1

I feel like I should start this review by saying that the Marie Jo ‘Catherine’ bra set is one I actually bought for my honeymoon 18 months ago. Though I didn’t really say so here, I was very reluctant about sharing a lot of wedding stuff on TLA, both because I assume most of you aren’t that interested and because weddings are deeply personal events. However, I was also extremely wary of brands that might want to capitalize on my nuptials by bragging about how I wore their products during my wedding/honeymoon. It was important to me to have a non-sponsored wedding. After all, it wasn’t The Lingerie Addict that was getting hitched – it was Cora Harrington.

Anyway, enough time has passed that I’m sure the danger, if it ever existed at all, has also passed as well. The good thing about the speed of internet news is that things get old after a week…much less after a year. And since I’ve started wearing this set again, it felt right to share a review here on TLA. I also don’t see many reviews of the Marie Jo brand, so I wanted to add to the body of knowledge. I can’t be the only person wondering how a bra that retails for over $150 at regular price fits and feels.

TLA_Primadonna_Catherine-3

Well,  if you only have a couple of minutes to read this review, let me just say…this set is wonderful. I love the fit. The materials are soft. And the lace is so gorgeous that I want a entire chemise made from it. I fully admit to being wary of most luxury brands and even more wary of brands that I believe represent the “old guard” of lingerie. But the Catherine bra set at least, is incredibly beautiful, and it reflects a certain sense of romance and delicacy that isn’t present in many of Marie Jo’s other, more well-known styles.

As with most of my lingerie reviews, I purchased the bra in size 34C and the knickers (a deep brief) in size Large. The lace is stunning Leavers lace in a floral print. The bra has a sheer, color-matched, micromesh lining on the outer two-thirds of the cup and the very first portion of the wing (if you’ll look just to the left of the cup in the image above or below, you’ll see a seam and the lace between the underwire and that seam is what has a mesh backing).  The gore is also backed in a sturdier powermesh, and has a small crystal or jewel hanging from it. There’s only one row of hook-and-eye closures at the back, and even by my admittedly lax standards (unintentional pun!), the band is very stretchy. Fortunately, I don’t mind a stretchy band, but that may be something to keep in mind if you run across this style on sale somewhere. The panty utilizes the same Leavers Lace with an embroidered opaque front panel and embroidered mesh sides and back. There is no shaping or powermesh (i.e. this is not a girdle), just a lot of gorgeous fabric.

TLA_Primadonna_Catherine-4

I was very happy with the fit of both of pieces, and though this bra set looks delicate, I found it to be suitable for everyday wear. I would not throw this into the washer and dryer as I don’t trust the lace to come out in good condition if you do, but it is fine to handwash and hang dry. As far as fit, the bra and panty were completely on-point for me, and I also thought the set was incredibly comfortable. Finally, I adore this vintage-inspired color. It makes me want to buy more blush lingerie.

While I don’t have plans to purchase anything else from Marie Jo right now, I would pick up the Catherine again if it was available in another colorway (like midnight blue) and preferably on sale. A quick glance at the their website, however, leads me to believe this particular range has been phased out (though the Tilda and the Lauren styles do catch my eye). All in all, I was very happy with this little experiment into a bra brand that’s become a little obscure nowadays.

What do you think of the Marie Jo brand and the Catherine set in particular? Have you tried any of their products? And would you wear this bra if it made a comeback?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lace in Lingerie: Different Types and How It’s Used

Victorian chantilly lace

Victorian chantilly laces from my personal collection

Lace is one of my absolute favourite things about lingerie – I’m absolutely obsessed with it.  Its transparent delicacy and floral intricacy are incomparable when it comes to lingerie fabrics – so it’s no surprise how heavily it’s used!  However, as far as materials go, it’s pretty expensive, for a variety of reasons. In this article I’m going to give you a brief introduction to this wonderful fabric and hopefully give you a better understanding of its significance in lingerie!

Lace was once created arduously by hand by skilled craftsman – it held a hugely valuable place in society, with its various trends evoking a person’s status in society.  Lace has always been a luxury fabric – whilst its individual fibres aren’t necessarily expensive in their raw state, it’s the huge amount of work that goes into creating them that carries this cost.  Hand made laces first began to appear in Italy around the late 15th century. For many centuries, laces were made by hand. The two basic types of hand-made laces are either needle lace, where the pattern is created with a needle and thread, or bobbin lace, where threads are wound onto weighted bobbins and twisted and plaited. However, these beautiful laces were rarely used on undergarments, instead being flaunted on outer clothing as a demonstration of wealth (that is, when it wasn’t outlawed for all but the clergy and aristocracy to wear!).

It wasn’t until the early 19th century that the most significant developments were made into machine-made laces.  Amongst these was the ‘Leavers’ lace machine in 1813 – a machine that is still in use today, and was arguably one of the most instrumental in creating the modern lace industry that we know today.  Please note that I’ve simplified the types of laces and machines greatly – there are many that I have chosen not to mention, and have instead chosen to cover the ones you will encounter most in lingerie.

'Monica' chemise by L'Agent by Agent Provocateur, using Raschel lace

‘Monica’ chemise by L’Agent by Agent Provocateur, using Raschel lace. Image from Net-A-Porter

Raschel lace – most contemporary laces are created on this machine, which uses a Jacquard apparatus to create the lace pattern, knitting whole rows of loops of thread at a time. This is the type of lace you’ll find most commonly in lingerie at lower price points – it is the fastest and easiest type of lace to manufacture, and one of the best for the use of synthetic fibres such as nylon.

Ayten Gasson's 'Orla' bralet uses an English Leavers lace trim

Ayten Gasson’s ‘Orla’ bralet uses an English Leavers lace trim. Image from Ayten Gasson.

Fleur of England's 'Pandora' babydoll uses French chantilly leavers lace

Fleur of England’s ‘Pandora’ babydoll uses French chantilly leavers lace. Image from Fleur of England.

Leavers lace – although an antique machine, some of the finest laces found in modern lingerie are still made of this type of lace. Originally the leavers lace industry was largely based in England (particularly Nottingham), but unfortunately there now remains only 1 manufacturer (who, conincidentally, makes many of the trims that Ayten Gasson uses in her designs).  Most leavers laces are now made in France, particularly in the region of Calais (in fact, many designers choose to refer to this type of lace as ‘Dentelle de Calais’).  These laces are incredibly fine, often with complex pattern. ‘Chantilly’ lace, where the pattern is interrupted throughout the design and surrounded by tulle, is a type of Leavers lace that requires threads to later be hand ‘clipped’ around the start and finish of each new lace design. You are most likely to find this type of lace used in high-end and luxury lingerie.

Freya's 'Arabella' style uses an embroidery in the top cup and knicker

Freya’s ‘Arabella’ style uses an embroidery in the top cup and knicker. Image from Freya.

Last season Bordelle created a custom 'thorn' embroidery for their lingerie designs

Last season Bordelle created a custom ‘thorn’ embroidery for their lingerie designs. Image from Baby Likes To Pony.

Schiffli embroidery – whilst this is not technically a lace, it is often mistaken for one. Machine embroideries are most commonly created using Schiffli machines, which lockstitches designs onto a tulle base.  These designs can be extremely complex and beautiful. You’ll find embroideries at all sides of the lingerie market – brands like Freya and Fauve use a great deal of embroideries in their designs, with more high-end brands such as Agent Provocateur using them in their designs. High-end brands are likely to have their own exclusive embroidery designs created just for them, as with Bordelle’s thorn embroidery from last season.

Myla's 'Layla' bra uses a guipure lace on the cups and cradle.

Myla’s ‘Layla’ bra uses a guipure lace on the cups and cradle. Image from Journelle.

Guipure lace – as with embroideries, Guipure is not technically a lace. It is in fact a heavy embroidery, where the tulle base has been chemically dissolved away, leaving the embroidered design free-standing. It is a fairly expensive fabric to use as its creation can be quite time consuming and resource heavy. Myla often use Guipure embroideries in their designs.

My 'Agata' set design uses a heavily embroidered and beaded French chantilly leavers lace on the cups and knickers

My ‘Agata’ set design uses a heavily embroidered and beaded French chantilly leavers lace on the cups and knickers

Close up detail of the lace used in my 'Agata' lingerie set design - featuring a chantilly lace base with embroidery and beading

Close up detail of the lace used in my ‘Agata’ lingerie set design – featuring a chantilly lace base with embroidery and beading

Embellished laces – often laces can be later worked into either by machine or by hand – some of the most popular techniques are cording (where thin pieces of cord are delicately stitched over the original lace design to add texture), embroidery (both hand and machine, where the lace design is gone over with stitching for emphasis) and beading (where beads and sequins are hand-stitched for further embellishment).  These can all be fairly costly varieties of lace, as they require very specialist and time consuming skills to create.

As well as there being these different types of lace, they can all also be found in totally different forms – different widths with different edgings, all of which hugely affects how the lace is used:

All-over – this type of lace is usually very wide and often does not necessarily have a finished edge – it is usually used the same as any other fabric and can be used to cover large areas in lace (for example, as the main fabric of a babydoll).

Trims – these are usually thin laces that are used either as edge finishings or embellishments on lingerie.

Flounce  – this type of lace has no set width but features two different styles of edge on either side – usually one side features a scallop, whilst the other is flat.  This lace is usually manufactured in matching symmetrical pairs. These laces (alongside galloons) are most commonly used in lingerie that features a scalloped edge.

Galloon – this type of lace features the same scallop design on both sides of the lace, meaning that symmetrical pieces can be cut from the same piece of lace.

Although it may not be something you’d ever considered, how lace is used can have a major influence on the cost of a garment. If a designer wants to use a scalloped edge along a bra cradle and wing, for example, they must pattern cut the bra to match up along each seam.  This means each fabric piece for the bra has to be cut with a little overlap, so that when they are sewn together it appears as though the design continues through the bra, even when interrupted by stitching.

Agent Provocateur Soiree's 'Adara' bra uses the lace's scallop throughout - on the cup, cradle and wing. This would incur quite a lot of waste but its price reflects this - £395 just for the bra

Agent Provocateur Soiree’s ‘Adara’ bra uses the lace’s scallop throughout – on the cup, cradle and wing. This would incur quite a lot of waste but its price reflects this – £395 just for the bra. Image from Agent Provocateur.

This type of pattern cutting has rather serious implications for garment cost, as it incurs an awful lot of waste – there are often large gaps between the cutting of each piece, regardless of how skilled the pattern cutter is.  Although the odd centimeter of lace being wasted may not seem that serious a cost problem, you have to consider scaling up in larger areas of industry. If each lace bra wastes 5cm of lace and 1000s of bras are being sewn in one go, this can amount to whole kilometers of waste. Alternatively, if a particularly expensive type of lace is being used, those 5cm can get very pricey – for example, a particular lace trim that I use in my designs is intricately beaded and costs around £35 a metre at wholesale price.  As an example,  that 5cm ends up costing around £1.50 per garment – imagine scaling that up for production!   Many brands work around these extra costs by topping an all-over lace fabric with a similar lace trim – the aesthetic is similar but usually costs a lot less!

This tulle maxi skirt form Rosamosario uses lace appliqué along the entire hem

This tulle maxi skirt form Rosamosario uses lace appliqué along the entire hem. Image from Net-A-Porter.

I covered the ins-and-outs of lace appliqué in a previous post, but this remains in my opinion one of the costliest ways to use lace in lingerie – not because there’s particularly vast amounts of the fabric being used, but purely because of the sheer volume of labour involved in stitching. Appliqué either involves ready-made lace motifs (often guipure) or hand cutting designs from a chantilly lace and then stitching around the edges onto the lingerie’s fabric to create an isolated piece of embellishment. Brands at lower-price points tend to use read-made lace motifs and tack just a couple of stitches on the most prominent parts of the motif.  Ususally though, the piece of lace is carefully machined with a zig-zag stitch along its intricate edge to attach it completely to the garment’s fabric.  This technique is most commonly seen in couture lingerie such as Carine Gilson and Rosamosario, where you’re unlikely to find lingerie selling for less than £500.

Readers: are you as fond of lace as I am? What is your favourite way that it’s used in lingerie?

Karolina

Karolina

Contour Fashion graduate. Spends most of her time sewing bras and getting excited by shiny things.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebook

Lingerie Lust Objects: Curriculum Vitae ‘Lauren’ Lace Top

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

Journelle Curriculum Vitae Lauren Lace Top 1

Meanwhile, in other things I am currently coveting but cannot afford, let’s talk about this ‘Lauren’ lace top from Curriculum Vitae (a brand I only just now discovered, by the way, because I am not cool).

While summer is definitely over, I don’t think the lingerie-as-outerwear look has to go out of style. And though this piece is technically for the boudoir, I really want to throw it over a longline, strapless microfiber bra and pair of cropped slacks (Does that even go together? I’m not a fashionista.) and pretend to be in my mid-twenties again while sipping white wine downtown. Yes, I know that’s a very specific daydream, but please just indulge me.

Journelle Curriculum Vitae Lauren Lace Top 2

What I most love about this top is that amazing paisley lace pattern. After visiting Interfiliere last year, I’ve been slightly obsessed with fabrics and textiles. A gorgeous lace just makes me feel all tingly inside, and the uniqueness of this pattern (combined with the width of it and the conspicuousness of it and the outright luxuriousness of it) just pushes all the right buttons. If I’m going to spend $345 on a top (yes, that’s the price of the ‘Lauren’), I want it to be something that I don’t see anywhere else. And this fits the bill.

Journelle Curriculum Vitae Lauren Lace Top 3

Of course, this lace shell is trimmed in silk. It’s also made in the USA. Sizing is XS thru L with Large fitting a maximum 12-14 US. If your size is sold out at Journelle (entirely possible since this item seems to be popular), you can also buy it directly Curriculum Vitae here. While I’m hoping I can grab this at the end of the season, I’m also not holding my breath. I wouldn’t blame anyone who can afford it for picking this little bit of lingerie magic up right now.

Have any of you heard of Curriculum Vitae? What do think of their aesthetic?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lingerie Lust Objects: Lucile London Lace Blouse

luciile london lace blouse

It’s been awhile since we’ve posted a lingerie lust object (referring, of course, to the actual object in the photo – the lingerie – and not the woman), but ever since I saw this lace blouse from the British designer label Lucile,  I just haven’t been able to stop thinking about it.

By this point in my lingerie obsession, it’s probably safe to call me a lace addict as well. I adore beautiful textiles, and lace, with it’s inherent delicacy, it’s interplay of sheer and opaque, and it’s infinite design possibilities is my all-time favorite lingerie material…especially in black (yes, something has finally taken the place of black mesh). The notion of being draped in something as opulent and luxurious as lace is endlessly thrilling.

I especially like this blouse because it’s so versatile. Yes, you could wear it as lingerie (a long-sleeved, modern take on the bedjacket, perhaps?), but it obviously works just as well as loungewear (paired with black silk pajama pants…mmmm) or outerwear (pencil skirt with a fan kickpleat, anyone?). And it’s the kind of piece that’s not only meant to be treasured, but also made to be admired. And I love that it’s finished with scallop edges and silk trim.

Of course, this article is a lust feature, which means this item has a luxury price tag to match. At £640 (approximately $1,062.37 USD), this is not a blouse for those looking for a deal. But if you have the means and you’ve been craving lace, this is perfect for you. According to the website, it’s available in sizes S, M, L with size large fitting around a US 10. Bespoke services are also available.

What do you think of this blouse? Is it the sort of thing you’d like to own?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lingerie Review: Lonely Sabel Cutout Bra & Tri Brief

Disclosure: This lingerie was sent to me free of charge for review purposes. All opinions are my own.

TLA Lonely Lingerie 1

I am so excited about today’s lingerie review! Though I’m feeling a little burnt out on the whole strappy trend, Lonely is a lingerie brand I’ve wanted to try for awhile, and let me just say right now that I am incredibly happy with the pieces I was given to review…far more than I expected to be.

Based in New Zealand, Lonely is a womenswear label that makes lounge, swim, and outerwear. I think of Lonely’s lingerie as their most popular offering (it’s certainly one of their oldest), but that could also be because of my specialty. Regardless, Lonely has quickly carved out a niche for themselves as an alternative, indie label with striking designs at a mid-level pricepoint. Their products are carried at Journelle, Lille Boutique, True & Co., and Nasty Gal, among other places.

As is true of many labels, Lonely Lingerie replenishes the same silhouettes season after season with new colors and fabrics. Their Sabel collection is one of their most popular ranges, and I receievd the cutout bra and brief in the gorgeous, woodsy green shown here (so Pacific Northwest!). As per usual, I tried a 34C bra and size L panty. Both pieces are made in China of a nylon/spandex blend.

TLA Lonely Lingerie 2

My first impression of this set was that the materials are super soft. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I was very happy with the quality of the fabric. I was also outright surprised as the level of textural detailing present, especially on the bra. While at first glance, it may seem like a straightforward (albeit slightly strappy) brassiere, there’s actually a lot happening here. The lace itself isn’t flat, but seems to have an almost embroidered overlay in some places (fabric people, help me out here?). The straps have a rich velvet texture, which immediately make this piece feel and look more lux. The band of the bra is mesh, so that’s a third texture. And then you have metal accent rings where the three cup straps join with the shoulder straps. Metal hardware on my lingerie (as opposed to the cheap plastic stuff) is my kryptonite. There’s no velvet detail on the panties, but they do have a lace front and mesh back joined with the same o-rings that are on the bra.

As far as fit, I was very happy with both pieces. The lace and mesh on the bra and knickers are super stretchy, both horizontally and vertically. This is probably not a bra to wear if you have a heavier bust or are looking for aggressive support and shaping. If you want a “natural” profile (i.e. more or less how you look without a bra), it’s great. The materials were not itchy against my skin, nor did the bra and panty create any tension points or pain points. I had no binding or digging in during any of the multiple times I wore this set. It was just comfortable through and though. Despite looking very “editorial” or “directional,” these pieces are perfect for everyday.

TLA Lonely Lingerie 3

I do have a couple of non-fit related notes though. The first is that there’s a good chance this bra will be visible if you’re wearing a t-shirt, tank top, or similar garment. Because the straps are both wide and made of velvet, any “peeking” looks very intentional, but it’s something to be aware if you prefer a more invisible look. The strap adjusters are also at the back of the bra, which is unusual and a bit awkward, to be perfectly honest. I’d have preferred them to be in the front, but I also understand that may have interfered with the aesthetics. Another note about the back is that the straps criss-cross. I don’t know if anyone else has my issues with image rotation and spatial awareness, but I also genuinely had some trouble figuring out how to put this bra on. It was a bit of a wrestling match the first couple of times, and I wound up seeing how this bra would look as a halterneck, among other things. The velvet side panels you can see in the photo above are not boned or reinforced anyway (which is fine with me, but I’m aware they make look boned in the photo), and this is a bra set you will probably not want to machine wash or dry…even on the delicate cycle. I’m all about shortcuts when it comes to lingerie washing, but this is definitely a handwash only piece. Honestly though, I think of all of this as small things.

Overall, I’m very happy with this set and would recommend it as a buy. Do any of you own some Lonely Lingerie? What do you think of their pieces?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lingerie of the Week: Dollhouse Bettie Lace Cocoon Robe

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

dollhouse bettie cocoon robe 1

As some of you know, I’ve been traveling a bit lately for lingerie market, the semiannual tradeshow circuit where brands view product and place orders for next season (in this case, Spring/Summer 2015). While the focus of market is on goods for the upcoming season, some brands also bring that’s available for this season along as well (those are called “immediates”). While I’ve seen Dollhouse Bettie’s Lace Cocoon Robe on their site for weeks now, it wasn’t until I viewed it person at the last couple of tradeshows, that I realized it was a “have to have it” item.

dollhouse bettie cocoon robe 2

Items like this tend to be a bit controversial or hit-and-miss when it comes to the general lingerie buying public. While I see a robe reminiscent of the Ziegfeld Follies (I love those photos by Alfred Cheney Johnston), other people may only see the “impracticality” of yards and yards of sheer, delicate lace. But this isn’t meant to be the kind of robe you wear to get warm or cover up after a bath. It’s meant to be a glamorous, luxurious indulgence. The kind of robe you’d wear in a boudoir photoshoot, for instance, or, if you’re especially stylish, could even wear out and about with your “regular” clothes.

dollhouse bettie cocoon robe 3

Like the rest of Dollhouse Bettie’s in-house line, this robe is ethically produced at their San Francisco headquarters. It’s also shockingly inexpensive for what you’re getting. I fully expected a price point near or above the $200 range; instead, it’s a comparatively reasonable $128. That’s not inexpensive enough to buy off the cuff perhaps, but it’s certainly well-priced for an affordable splurge or holiday present. And again, it’s produced fairly and ethically in the USA. Because of the loose, voluminous construction, this piece is also one size fits all.

What do you think of Dollhouse Bettie’s Cocoon Robe? Is this something you would wear? Please share your thoughts!

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Sale Lingerie of the Week: ID Sarrieri Innamorata Padded Push-Up Bra Set

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

id sarriere innamorata padded push up bra

It’s hard to convey just how much of a fan I am of ID Sarrieri. This luxury European designer puts together some of the most gorgeous pieces I see season after season. Their laces are exquisite; their silks are divine. And unlike some luxury brands, ID Sarrieri’s products look just as good in person and under up-close inspection as they do styled online and in their editorial lookbooks. I dream of owning something from this label one day…though I’m not sure if I should wear my purchase or frame it.

id sarriere innamorata bra setID Sarrieri’s ‘Innamorata’ set is made from dove gray silk and ivory lace and is the perfect combination of smooth and sheer. The demi cup bra is ideal for wearing under almost anything (because why save your most beautiful lingerie for special occasions?), and the transparent tulle of the knickers feels like a whisper against the skin (though the low rise cut also makes them eminently wearable). This is luxurious yes, but it’s also suited for everyday life. No matter what you may have to wear on top, you can always have the feel of silk and lace on your skin underneath.

As with most sale items, sizing is limited. The bra currently retails for $112 and the knicker for $75. Both prices are 50% off the original price.

What do you think of ID Sarrieri? Is this your style of lingerie?

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lingerie of the Week: Fauve by Fantasie ‘Evangeline’

Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links.

fauve by fantasie evangeline

I’d actually chosen another item for this week’s Lingerie of the Week. I’ve been traveling for the last 10 days, so I tried to work ahead by preselecting this week’s feature. I should have known better. Because as soon I saw this ‘Evangeline’ set, I knew it was the one…for this week anyway.

Molded cups aren’t really my “thing” anymore, but I am a fool for gorgeous lace. And the pairing of this lace with a beige background is so classic, so elegant, so timeless that I couldn’t help but fall in love. Those of you who are familiar with lingerie may also recognize the names “Fauve” and “Fantasie” as popular brands within the full bust community, and this gorgeous bra is available in sizes 30D thru 36G & 38FF. The matching knickers (which, let’s be real, I want to own despite being sized out of the bra) are available in sizes XS thru XL.

Fauve is a high-end brand, and this is some gorgeous lace, so the bra retails for an unsurprising $102 (the panties are $48). However, if you’ve been looking for a set that’s luxe enough for special occasions but also perfectly fine for everyday wear, I think this is it.

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube

Lingerie Lust: Felice Art Couture

Editor’s Note: NSFW images below.

Felice-Art-Couture-Morning-Star-Velvet-Robe-2

I love lace. Embroidery too. But especially lace.

It’s not just the delicate, gauze, ephemeral nature of beautiful lace, it’s also the artistry. Even machine made lace takes a tremendous amount of time and resources to produce, and the more complex a lace, the more beautiful it is. And while lace is beautiful on lingerie (which we both already know), it’s even more gorgeous when incorporated into daily wear. And that’s why I’m really digging Felice Art Couture. Not only is the lace (and embroidery) brilliant, these are also pieces meant to be worn everyday. Favorites for me include the sheer caftans, though the lace camisoles and velvet robes are beautiful too.

Felice Art Couture’s in-house sizing runs 1,2,3, fitting letter sizes XS thru XXL (max of a US 16 according to the size chart). Pricing starts around the $200 mark and maxes out around the $2,000 range. These are delicate garments, with dry clean only recommended for many styles (though not all).

What do you think of Felice Art Couture? Do you see anything you would wear? And what are your thoughts on incorporating lace into your daily wardrobe?

Felice-Art-Couture-Soleil-Robe

Felice-Art-Couture-Soleil-Kaftan

Felice-Art-Couture-Soleil-Chemise

Felice-Art-Couture-Muse-Sheer-Kaftan-2

Felice-Art-Couture-Sheer-Grace-Tank

Felice-Art-Couture-Morning-Dew-Set

Felice-Art-Couture-Coral-Shine-Sheer-Dress-2

Felice-Art-Couture-Summer-Breeze-Kaftan-2

Felice-Art-Couture-Pure-Summer-Kaftan

Felice-Art-Couture-Bird-of-Paradise-Dress

Felice-Art-Couture-Shanghai-Monsoon-Sheer-Dress

Felice-Art-Couture-luxury-silk-lingerie-boudoir-bondage-bridal-honeymoon-2

Cora

Cora

Founder and Editor in Chief of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in a small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, it's become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and has been featured on the websites for Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every who wants it deserves gorgeous lingerie.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle PlusFlickrStumbleUponYouTube