12 Pretty Mastectomy Bras

Lately, I’ve gotten several requests for a blog post on pretty mastectomy bras. This is definitely a topic I’ve been wanting to cover for awhile (while researching for this post, I came across a draft from 2010!), but I’ve often been thwarted because there aren’t many pretty mastectomy bras out there.

Despite the popularity of Breast Cancer Awareness campaigns, the lingerie industry doesn’t appear to have caught up with the needs of post-surgery breast cancer survivors. From what I can tell, the two big names in mastectomy bras appear to be Anita and Royce (stores based in the UK appear to have more of a selection than shops within the US), and boutiques like Nordstrom and Chantilly Rose offer pocketing for the bras they sell, even if those bras weren’t originally mastectomy bras.

While this article does give a few options, I hope it’s seen as a start on the conversation of mastectomy bras, not the end of one. If you know of places that make or sell nice mastectomy bras, please include them in the comments. And if you’re a breast cancer survivor and would like to write an article on this subject for The Lingerie Addict, please do get in touch.

Royce Champagne Truffle Mastectomy Bra – £23.33

Royce Pink Champagne Mastectomy Bra – £23.33

Royce Mink Champagne Velvet Mastectomy Bra – £25.00

Nicola Jane Black Pearl Mastectomy Bra – £26.99

Figleaves Royce Chloe Mastectomy Bra – $41.00

Royce Heather Mastectomy Bra – $42.00

Darcey Mastectomy Bra – £35.00

Camelia Mastectomy Bra – £45.00

Peony Mastectomy Bra – £45.00

Myosotis Mastectomy Bra – £45.00

Anita Versailles Mastectomy Bra – £52.00

BodyRock Sport Natalie Mastectomy Bra – $95.00

Cora

Cora

Founder and Chief Editor of The Lingerie Addict. I started TLA in small studio apartment in 2008. Since then, my little site has become the leading lingerie blog in the world, and it's been featured in Entrepreneur, Forbes, CNN, Time, Today, and Fox News. I believe lingerie is fashion too, and that every woman deserves gorgeous underpinnings that help her feel comfortable and confident. Body snark free zone since 2012.

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10 Comments

  1. 10/05/13 at 6:51

    I recall seeing a positive review of that BodyRock bra via The Lingerie Lesbian. Even though I never suffered from cancer, I must say I would love to have that particular bra! One thing that I am curious about (and have always been), what’s the difference between a “normal” bra and a mastectomy one? Sorry if I sound silly!

    • Consol
      10/05/13 at 21:32

      A mastectomy bra has ‘pocketses,’ as Gollum would say ; -) The pocket holds the breast form, if the breast cancer survivor opted not to have reconstructive surgery.

      • 11/05/13 at 9:26

        That’s interesting! Whatever it is, I think there should be more fashionable mastectomy bras out in the market.

  2. Amoena also makes some wonderful mastectomy bras. Not quite as much lace and color as those shown in this post, but still pretty and very well made.

  3. Lyndsay
    30/05/13 at 13:58

    They don’t sell anything online yet, but Chuchi Cheeks in Olds Alberta (central Alberta Canada) sells mastectomy bras. So if anyone is in that area and does not want to travel to Calgary or Edmonton, which can be a hassle or long drive, they are an option. The lines they carry are Anita for mastectomy and TAB.

  4. W. Joevenazzo
    14/08/13 at 16:46

    La Vie en Rose is a Canadian company that carries a lovely line of mastectomy bras. There aren’t a lot of them but they are nice. And their pricing and exchange policy is excellent. Plus the bras come with prosthesis’ included.

  5. 29/08/13 at 17:06

    At Linea Intima in Toronto we have a seamstress who will sew pockets into non-mastectomy bras. And as Elisabeth mentioned, Amoena is another great company that shouldn’t be forgotten. They actually have some very beautiful (and dare I say, sexy!) mastectomy bras available this fall.

  6. Julie
    12/09/13 at 19:00

    I am so glad that someone is talking about this. I am 50 years young and I just recently had a double mastectomy. I have been so frustrated that I can’t find bras and/or camisoles that are at the very least pretty and, at the very most, sexy. This surgery has had a huge effect on my sexuality. Wearing pretty undergarments is part of being a woman. I guess I’ll have to go shopping in Europe or Canada. Why is the U.S. so far behind?

  7. Anonymous
    18/10/13 at 2:18

    Thanks for making this post.

    I happen to work for one of the named companies, in the interest of disclosure. This statement has not been authorized by the company, and does not represent its position on anything, it is just my opinion and my personal observation.

    I’ll tell you why there is a problem finding more than utilitarian mastectomy lingerie in the boutiques, although they exist. I can sum it up in one word: insurance.

    The following is explained in very general terms, and mileage may vary.

    Most insurance companies do not provide much coverage for mastectomy bras. Because the reimbursement rate is low, many of the really beautiful bras are just not available because it is not financially feasible to carry them. Depending on what state you live in, the allowable rate for Medicare coverage can be as high as around $40 for a bra, but often times is in the mid to low $30s. It’s even worse for Medicaid. And Medicare and Medicaid only pay 80% of that allowable rate. The customer is on the hook for the balance, unless they have some kind of supplemental coverage that picks up the difference.
    If a shop is a “participating provider” with Medicare or Medicaid, they are obligated to accept the government’s payment as payment in full – which means that no matter what the item costs, they are only going to receive the reimbursement rate for that state and charging more for it is illegal. Many medical supply shops and Orthotic & Prosthetic shops are in this boat. This makes it financially unfeasible to carry the most beautiful of bras, because many of them are too expensive for the retailer to carry.

    HMO plans are often very similar to this situation. Most women will not be able to purchase a pretty bra without having to pay for it fully out of pocket due to the nature of the contracts that the insurance companies have with the boutiques. The insurance companies ask the boutiques to take a low reimbursement rate but also throw in a double whammy – they often disallow them from accepting more money than the allowable rate (charging an upgrade) so that people who want choice can just pay the difference. It’s an unnecessary hassle. Not everyone’s contracts are the same and some places will have the ability to charge upgrades, but it’s very uneven. I suppose that this is the insurance companies’ method of bending the cost curve down.

    Regardless, the retailer has to decide how much of a sacrifice they can make in carrying pretty bras, because most people simply won’t pay for it at full cost, even if they get some reimbursement for the bra after the point of sale transaction is complete. Insurance changes a lot of people’s expectations. It’s funny, some women would pay $70 for a Wacoal bra at Nordstrom and yet wouldn’t want to pay the difference for a pretty mastectomy bra because there is some coverage for a bra through their insurance. Perhaps because the brands are not well known these women feel that there is not the same quality and value? Who knows.

    People can google “mastectomy boutique” or just “mastectomy” in Google Maps to find shops that sell mastectomy bras and breast prostheses.

    Cora, I did give you my work address in the submission form and I’d be happy to talk to you if you want to do more research on the subject.

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